Didn’t I Say to Make My Abilities Average in the Next Life?! Everyday Misadventures!, Volume 1

Book Info

Didn’t I Say to Make My Abilities Average in the Next Life?! Everyday Misadventures!, Volume 1
  • Format: manga
  • Story: FUNA and Itsuki Akata
  • Art: Yuki Moritaka
  • Translator: Diana Taylor
  • Adaptation: Julia Kinsman
  • Letterer: Simone Harrison
  • Publisher: Seven Seas

Review

The title for the original light novel series Didn’t I Say to Make My Abilities Average in the Next Life?! obviously wasn’t unwieldy enough, as here is its spinoff manga, subtitled Everyday Misadventures!

In format, the book is mostly a fairly standard 4-koma in both content and panel design (though there are times it breaks out into a more traditional panel format too).

Where the original novels focus on the bigger events in the adventuring party’s lives, we get to see here a number of fun, smaller adventures. These range from finding a lost cat, to selling vases, to fishing. Each chapter is a standalone story; there’s no overarching story going through the volume, nor are there any firm ties to specific events from the novels. (Unlike, say, the Miss Kobayashi’s Dragon Maid spinoffs.)

The book assumes the reader is already familiar with the characters; it doesn’t make any effort to introduce them, and to a certain extent they’re reduced to well-known quirks readers would be familiar with. Some of these work well, like Pauline’s love of money; others, not so much. (Namely, the heavy play given to Mile’s interest in beast girls comes across as creepy, if you’re not already familiar with her and know she’s a more well-rounded character.)

Summary

If you’re not already reading the Abilities Average novels, start there instead. But for fans of the novels, Everyday Misadventures is a fun set of side stories. ⭐⭐⭐⭐

Reincarnated as a Sword, Vol. 7

Book Info

Reincarnated as a Sword, Vol. 7
Reincarnated as a Sword, Vol. 7
  • Format: light novel
  • Author: Yuu Tanaka
  • Illustrator: Llo
  • Translator: Michael Rachmat
  • Adaptation: Cae Hawksmoor
  • Publisher: Seven Seas

Review

I think this volume of Reincarnated as a Sword might feature the least amount of curry eating to date. Instead, Fran spends her time… teaching newbies how to fight?

The focus of this volume is the trip to the Beastman Nation. Before taking off, Fran helps the local guild master school some overconfident young adventurers. Afterwards, she signs onboard a ship heading for the Beastman Nation, serving as a guard against pirate attacks if needed.

She’s not the only adventurer who will be on board for the trip – there’s a handful of other parties, including the group of overconfident adventurers from earlier. They make an smart request – they ask Fran to help instruct them so they can be better adventurers. This isn’t something Teacher pushes on her – she wants to do it.

Unfortunately, we don’t get to see much of the teaching sessions. But the fact that Fran is becoming a teacher of her own, of her own volition, is interesting to see. I hope we see more of this in future volumes.

Instead of focusing on the teaching sessions, we’re treated to a naval conflict with the former king of the pirate nation of Seedrun. There’s nothing new here for people who have been reading Reincarnated as a Sword all along – it’s the same process we’ve seen in prior books, with Teacher and Fran unable to defeat the new foe until they level up their power again. And engaging in a spot of unnecessary torture along the way.

In the end, Fran arrives at the Beastman Nation, finally putting her in place to pursue the business promised at the end of volume 6.

Summary

Nothing particularly new here. A bit of character development, though I would have liked to see more. But mostly just moving the plot along to set things up for the next volume. ⭐⭐⭐

Our Teachers are Dating! Volume 1

Book Info

Our Teachers are Dating! Volume 1
Our Teachers are Dating! Volume 1
  • Format: manga
  • Author: Pikachi Ohi
  • Translator: Jennifer Ward
  • Adaptation: Rebecca Scoble
  • Letterer: Erika Terriquez
  • Publisher: Seven Seas

Review

Our Teachers Are Dating! is exactly what it says on the cover: a yuri manga featuring two high school teachers – gym teacher Hayama Asuka and biology teacher Terano Saki.

The book stands out on its own for having adult protagonists. My instinct is to try to pin them down with stereotypes, but that’s hard. It’s not like one of them is the shy one and one as the easygoing one, for example; they both take turns leading things and following the other. The characters are well-rounded but distinct.

While the two teachers did know each other and work together before the book started, they were just coworkers. We don’t see much of the pair in the classroom, but the school setting is important and helps to drive both the plot and the character elements along. Their relationship progresses quickly over the six main chapters of the book, from asking each other out, to their first official date, through to sleeping together for the first time. There’s even a hot springs trip.

In addition to the two protagonists, two other teachers at the school have minor recurring roles. So far they seem to be there mostly for exposition, but it wouldn’t surprise me to see either of them end up in a relationship of their own in future volumes.

Summary

I was actually surprised to see the “To Be Continued” at the end – I’d missed that this was volume 1, and the volume concluded so perfectly that if it was a one-shot I would have been satisfied. I look forward to reading more as these characters’ romance evolves. ⭐⭐⭐⭐⭐

Mushoku Tensei: Jobless Reincarnation, Volume 8

Book Info

Mushoku Tensei: Jobless Reincarnation, Volume 8
Mushoku Tensei: Jobless Reincarnation, Volume 8

Review

Volume 8 of Mushoku Tensei picks up about a year after Volume 7 ended. Where the last volume ended with a side-step to the Ranoa University of Magic, we open with protagonist Rudeus Greyrat receiving an invitation to become essentially a graduate student there – full scholarship, no classes, able to spend all of his time working on magic research.

Even though it’s the alma mater of his elementary school crush, Roxy, Rudeus isn’t willing to go; he wants to keep looking for the last member of his family missing from the Fittoa Displacement Incident. But the Hand of the Author Man-God tells Rudeus that he should go to the university and take advantage of the offer and spend his time researching the Displacement Incident. Cannily, the Man-God promises Rudeus a fix for his erectile dysfunction if he goes. As should surprise no readers at this point, that’s more than enough to convince Rudeus to go.

The university ends up being something of an old home week for Rudeus. The overall experience is reminiscent of the high school life that he missed out on, down to the Japanese-style uniforms and start-of-term speeches from the principal and the student council president. Rudeus makes a good start, diving right into his research. Unfortunately, he ends up quickly engaging in some morally questionable actions, beyond his usual gentleman-pervert status.

The problems start with Rudeus helping a fellow student purchase a slave for Rudeus to train up as a magician. While Rudeus does try to make sure she’s treated well – more like an adopted child than anything – the fact that he doesn’t even say a word about the practice is disturbing. Rudeus then quickly follows that up by abducting some of his fellow students for a fairly tenuous reason, and briefly molests them in the process.

In the end, the volume fizzles out. Rudeus’s actions in the back half of the book aren’t great. Afterwards, the volume ends, without any sort of a climax in the plot.

But while the contents of the book were terrible, I still found it compelling enough to keep reading. So, kudos to the author, translator, and other contributors for managing to keep my interest despite Rudeus’s moral failings. The lack of an ending was disappointing, not a relief.

Summary

While the time jump could have been a new jumping-on point, the fact that Rudeus was kind of a dick throughout the book makes it hard to recommend for anybody new. But the writing still kept me hooked for the rest of the book, making the weak ending even more disappointing. ⭐⭐⭐

Adachi and Shimamura, Vol. 2

Book Info

Adachi and Shimamura, Vol. 2
Adachi and Shimamura, Vol. 2
  • Format: light novel
  • Author: Hitoma Iruma
  • Illustrator: Non
  • Translator: Molly Lee
  • Publisher: Seven Seas

Review

It’s been several months since I read volume 1 of this series, so apologies in advance for anything I’m not remembering correctly.

Volume 2 of Adachi and Shimamura shows us Adachi trying to come to terms with being in love with Shimamura, while Shimamura continues to be blissfully ignorant.

Yashiro the alien astronaut takes a back seat this time around, only making a few cameo appearances in interludes. The focus of this volume is a Christmas outing. After Adachi invites Shimamura out, they each go shopping for a present for the other (each accompanied by one of Shimamura’s other friends from the first volume – serious Hino with Adachi, and offbeat Nagafuji with Shimamura), before we get to the outing itself. There’s no interruption from Yashiro this time; it’s just the two title characters, spending Christmas together.

Is it a date? Depends on who you ask.

The book is tough to read, in a good way; Adachi’s social awkwardness comes through very well on the page, and I very much empathize with her. She knows what she wants out of her relationship with Shimamura, but she has problems getting her feelings across. Shimamura, meanwhile, seems almost deliberately clueless of Adachi’s feelings – and when she asks Adachi outright, Adachi can’t bring herself to admit what she wants.

The series continues to feel more realistic than the other romance light novels I’ve read so far. No forceful intervention from a teacher, no uber-rich neighbor, no socialite training the protagonist for unclear reasons… just one ordinary girl trying to get across what the other one means to her, and too often failing.

Summary

If you didn’t like the first volume, this book isn’t going to change your mind. But I like seeing Adachi try to work her way through her feelings in a way that I never could, even without the same-gender complication. I want to see where this goes… and I hope neither Adachi nor Shimamura gets hurt along the way. ⭐⭐⭐⭐

Who Says Warriors Can’t Be Babes? Volume 1

Book Info

Who Says Warriors Can't Be Babes? Volume 1
Who Says Warriors Can’t Be Babes? Volume 1

Review

The premise for Who Says Warriors Can’t Be Babes is remarkably simple: the main character, an incredibly strong warrior (known simply as “Warrior Woman”), joins the party of a hero who rescued her as a child. That led to her crushing on him, and doing everything she can to get strong, join his party, and win his hand. Unfortunately, she’s too good of a warrior, and the hero isn’t able to see past that and to her feminine side.

This isn’t the first manga with a similar premise – Tomo-chan is a Girl! immediately springs to mind. But where Tomo-chan was a relationship story masquerading as a four-panel gag comedy, Warriors seems to want to be a four-panel gag comedy using a more normal page layout. There’s not a lot of depth to these characters – we don’t even know any of their names, just their character classes.

Unfortunately, Warriors probably works better in its original magazine incarnation than in volume form. By the end of the tenth chapter in the volume, the repetition was starting to wear. Warrior Woman tries to attract the Hero’s eye; things go overboard; she fails in her goal. There’s no added depth to the relationship as things go on, nor do we see anything from the other character’s points of view to know how they see her.

But while I didn’t think the story lived up to its potential, the art is fantastic. We get a wide variety of facial expressions and reaction shots, giving us variety in the art even when the plot doesn’t. I also liked the lettering; I’m a sucker for a good pixel-based font, even if it’s not actually a game-like setting.

One additional note, the first chapter is significantly lewder than the rest of the volume. While some sexualized outfits show up later in the book, nothing approaches that chapter plot-wise; even the bonus chapter is tamer.

Summary

Who Says Warriors Can’t Be Babes? is an interesting idea but the execution didn’t pique my interest enough to keep me reading the series. ⭐⭐⭐

The Hidden Dungeon Only I Can Enter, Vol. 2

Book Info

The Hidden Dungeon Only I Can Enter, Vol. 2
The Hidden Dungeon Only I Can Enter, Vol. 2
  • Format: light novel
  • Author: Meguru Seto
  • Illustrator: Takehana Note
  • Translator: T. Emerson
  • Adaptation: Cae Hawksmoor
  • Publisher: Seven Seas

Review

Volume two of The Hidden Dungeon Only I Can Enter doesn’t change much from the first volume. The overall story for this volume is the first set of exams at the Hero Academy. To pass them with a high enough score to skip summer school, Noir and Emma will need to turn in 100,000 points worth of monster loot – which means slaying a dragon. But before they can do that, they need to get strong enough to take one on.

It may be just me, but it felt like the second volume toned down the lasciviousness. Noir still indulges in physical interactions with his harem women for the sake of building up his LP, but – outside of one of the bonus chapters – it felt much more perfunctory this time around; it happened but wasn’t as detailed as I remember from the first volume.

There’s not much to note in character growth in this volume. Noir and Emma’s stat numbers go up, but they don’t really learn anything new. Noir continues to put his Get Creative ability and its cohort to good use, coming up with solutions unique to each set of enemies that he faces.

Summary

Hidden Dungeon volume 2 is just as much a quick read as the first volume. While the characters are relatively static so far, as long as the Get Creative logic puzzles keep coming I’m happy to keep reading. ⭐⭐⭐⭐, Recommended for fans of the series.

The Hidden Dungeon Only I Can Enter, Vol. 1

Book Info

The Hidden Dungeon Only I Can Enter, Vol. 1
The Hidden Dungeon Only I Can Enter, Vol. 1
  • Format: light novel
  • Author: Meguru Seto
  • Illustrator: Takehana Note
  • Translator: T. Emerson
  • Adaptation: Cae Hawksmoor
  • Publisher: Seven Seas

Review

The Hidden Dungeon Only I Can Enter‘s premise is two-fold. The first half is right there in the title – there’s a hidden dungeon, that only protagonist Noir Stardia can enter. The second half cranks the power fantasy up to 11: he has the near-unique ability to create, edit, and bestow magical skills on people and things, provided he has sufficient LP. And LP are earned from indulging his base desires.

This is not an 18+ novel, so said desires don’t go too far. Good food, hugs, kissing… nothing that requires removing or going under clothing. However, this is still probably enough to lose much of the reading audience. (The definition of LP is not given that I noticed, but I suspect it stands for “lust points”.)

The setting is a typical fantasy-world-with-a-stats-system. Noir is a member of an adventurer’s guild, as well as attending an academy for would-be heroes. In morning he attends classes with his childhood friend, Emma Brightness; in the afternoon they go on guild quests for money and rank points.

Being a fantasy light novel, Noir can’t help but acquire a harem on his adventures. He starts with Emma, but gains other members through his adventures in the book, including the guild receptionist. (And of course his little sister wants in too.)

The story arc of the first volume is about getting into the Hero Academy, and introducing his harem fellow students, as well as an elf healer who wil join him on his future quests. So far there’s not much of an overall plot to the series, beyond Noir’s classroom and adventuring life.

The unique selling point to the series isn’t the Hidden Dungeon itself; it’s Noir’s skill creation and editing abilities. He can’t just win with power; he needs to “Get Creative” in order to succeed against his foes. The limitation on requiring LP helps keep this focuses, meaning we should continue to see unique (cheap) solutions to conflicts rather than Noir just making himself overpowered.

Summary

If there’s such a thing as “wholesome ecchi”, then Hidden Dungeon is it. The setting is cliché but I liked the characters, and Noir’s editing skills keep things interesting. This is not highbrow literature in the slightest; but I thought it was a quick, enjoyable read. ⭐⭐⭐⭐, Recommended for harem fans.

I’m in Love with the Villainess, Vol. 1

Book Info

I’m in Love with the Villainess, Vol. 1
  • Format: light novel
  • Author: Inori
  • Illustrator: Hanagata
  • Translator: Jenn Yamazaki
  • Adaptation: Nibideta Sen
  • Publisher: Seven Seas

Review

Resurrection into otome games has become a hot genre recently. Most of these have the protagonist reborn as the villainess of a game they’re familiar with, trying to avoid the canonical bad end in their future. As you might be able to figure out from the title, I’m in Love with the Villainess turns things on their head. Our protagonist was reborn as the game’s commoner heroine Rae Taylor. But she still wants to avoid the bad end for the villainess, noble Claire François – so that Rae can pursue Claire romantically!

From the start, it’s made clear that Rae doesn’t really expect Claire to reciprocate. A lesbian in her original life in Japan. she had a crush on Claire from playing the game. But Rae knows what’s coming – the game is called Revolution, with everything that implies – and she wants to make sure that, no matter what happens, Claire survives and is happy, even if that means she ends up with someone other than Rae.

That doesn’t stop Rae from, ten seconds after waking up in the game world, professing her love for Claire.

And getting promptly shot down.

And enjoying it.

Rae’s masochistic tendencies are a source of comedy throughout the work. I have to admit that if I were Claire, I’d probably find Rae obnoxious. The way Rae inveigles her way into Claire’s life and employment as her maid is little short of stalking. But the problematic implications of Rae’s actions are hidden behind the comedy.

The first volume is spent introducing us to the main cast, the Academy shared between commoners and nobles that they attend, and the tension between commoners and nobles in the world. We see the tension briefly spark a flame, but nothing like the promised Revolution. In the narration, Rae uses her knowledge of the game to foreshadow that there are worse things to come in the future for our characters, promising that the series’ narrative thrust won’t give out anytime soon.

Summary

I’m in Love with the Villainess is a delightful twist on the otome villainess stories that we’ve seen in English. I don’t know if I could call it a romance novel yet, as the relationship is clearly one-sided. The novel manages to give the greater fantasy world just as much play as the romance, expanding its appeal to a wider audience. Hopefully we’ll see that continue as the series goes on. ⭐⭐⭐⭐, Recommended for everybody.

Roll Over and Die: I Will Fight for an Ordinary Life with My Love and Cursed Sword! Vol. 1

Book Info

Roll Over and Die: I Will Fight for an Ordinary Life with My Love and Cursed Sword! Vol. 1
Roll Over and Die: I Will Fight for an Ordinary Life with My Love and Cursed Sword! Vol. 1

Review

As an unashamed fan of both fantasy and yuri, Roll Over and Die is squarely in my wheelhouse.

The novel manages to be an interesting mix of adhering to and rejecting fantasy light novel clichés. It starts off stereotypically: There’s a party of heroes, including sixteen-year-old protagonist Flum Apricot, who are setting out to save the world from the demon lord. The world features RPG-like stats and “save points” for teleportation. The protagonist is part of the party because prophecy demands it. Our first clue that something is different is when the protagonist turns out to be completely powerless: all her stats are zero. The second clue is when, at the end of the first chapter, her party gets rid of her by selling her into slavery.

This sets the tone for the rest of the book – this is very definitely a dark title. Slavery, of course, is its own common cliché in fantasy light novels. However, since this is not an isekai, the protagonist can be forgiven for accepting it as a normal part of the world. Fortunately, Flum is able to break herself out of slavery after picking up the eponymous cursed sword. Her captor expects it to kill her; instead, it ends up boosting her stats, to where she can free herself and another survivor, Milkit.

Milkit has been a slave her whole life; she thinks solely in terms of pleasing her master. She’s at a loss when given a chance to go free. Recognizing this, Flum decides to make herself Milkit’s new master, with the hope of being able to wean her into a more self-sufficient mindset.

Complicating this is the fact that Flum has fallen in love with Milkit. (Or perhaps just fallen in lust? The meeting-to-relationship timeframe is very quick, but perhaps not unusual for someone her age.) As you would expect from the master/slave relationship, and their short time together, their romantic relationship is hardly healthy. Fortunately Flum recognizes that, but whether they can make it healthy is yet to be seen. (Or indeed if she even wants to…)

Once together, the author again takes refuge in cliché by making Flum an adventurer in order to be able to provide for the pair. The back half of the book is focused on Flum’s second quest, and some unfortunate events that happen during it. There’s some interesting worldbuilding here, although going into detail risks spoiling the reader. Probably the best way to summarize it is that while the present doesn’t have anything worth detailing, I’m intrigued by some of the backstory and look forward to finding out more in future volumes.

Towards the end of the book, Flum encounters “ruins” that seem to be made from what would be futuristic technology to us. There’s no explanation for where they came from, or why there’s old documents there that mention Flum. There’s a visual novel series with a similar aesthetic that had an interesting backstory to explain them; I look forward to seeing where this goes in future volumes of the series.

Summary

The author says in the afterword that the book is “meant for a pretty niche audience”. I think the audience is a bit wider than they suggest; I don’t think you need to be a yuri or horror fan to enjoy the book. But the (dark) fantasy clichés are prevalent enough that if you’re not a fantasy fan already you’ll probably find it hard to get through. There’s not much romance, and what’s there is decidedly not fluffy. But I enjoyed it, and will continue reading the series. ⭐⭐⭐⭐, Recommended for fantasy fans.